10.5k

Outreach encounters to health care professionals to-date as part of the Choose Well initiative.

Active outreach to medical professionals, pharmacists and educators provides education, training and resources. Those encounters, in turn, increase youth access to contraception and create teen-friendly services.

80k+

Number of condoms distributed through new partnerships created by the Choose Well initiative.

Community corner stores, hair and nail salons, barbershops, and laundromats have partnered with the campaign in the state’s four major metropolitan areas. The sites distribute free condoms, brown-bag condom kits, and educational materials.

8

Number of South Carolina high schools that have utilized the New Morning Foundation teen pregnancy prevention model.

The test high schools, with diverse student populations, have helped us refine our initiative, incorporate lessons learned and best practices, and measure effectiveness.

1-2

Two high school test sites reduced the number of student pregnancies from 15+ annually to just 1-2 each school year.

The St. John's High School test site experienced 15-20 pregnancies per school year before the intervention model was implemented. Six years later, the school experienced only one or two student pregnancies per school year.

6

Number of communities where SC DHEC has replicated NMF's teen clinic prototype.

The four Charleston-based clinics provide confidential access to STI and family planning services at locations highly accessible to youth.

93%

Percent of students receiving contraceptive prescriptions during clinical services accessed as part of New Morning Foundation's model program.

Independent research confirmed that students at the St. John’s High School test site made more visits to clinics. They also used contraception more than other test sites.

54%

How less likely that a New Morning Foundation pregnancy model student will become pregnant when compared to peers.

Students in the two oldest program sites are 54% less likely than their peers to become pregnant and 41% less likely to give birth.